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Discovering And Correcting Lip Tie On A Toddler And An Infant

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When my son was born, I told the nurse at the hospital that I wanted to see a lactation consultant because he wasn’t latching correctly. She told me there wasn’t one available that day, assured me he was fine, and that I just needed to reposition him. Having just given birth and being very emotional, I was desperate to go home to my toddler whom I had never left for more than a few hours, so I believed this nurse.

But I knew something wasn’t right. Even though my son was gaining weight and pooping away, the pain of nursing was unbearable and I thought I was getting mastitis, but then the pain went away. At around 3 months, my La Leche leader noticed that it did not look like he was latching as far as he should be and asked that I have him checked for tongue tie. The pediatrician said he didn’t have it, and that because he was gaining weight, he was fine.

But mothers always know. Even if we don’t know what it is, we know when something is wrong.

It is becoming up to us to figure out what is going on with our babies. Nowadays, many people turn to Facebook to ask questions relating to health, as sometimes it’s easier asking total strangers. So when a mother on a babywearing group I’m a member of posted a photo of her 7 month old daughter and asked if she had lip tie, my heart started beating fast as I read through all the comments, and my head started saying “This is it.”

So I looked under his top lip, and sure enough, clear as day, there was his upper labial frenulum, starting from his lip and working all the way down to his gums, reaching where his two front teeth will eventually come through.

I tried to take a good photo, but 6 month old babies don’t like being held down, so here are three examples of what lip tie in a babies can look like
how-to-diagnose-tongue-and-lip-ties-2

 

So I put the kids to bed and researched like my life depended on it. It’s hereditary- does that mean I have it? Run to the mirror, yes, I do! This is why my mother was told she had no supply after a month, because no-one caught onto the fact that my lip was tied.

Some of the symptoms associated with a lip tie in babies are:

  • Difficulty latching correctly to breastfeed
  • Colic/gassiness/reflux from incorrect latch
  • Baby thrashing/pulling away from breast
  • Baby’s latch falling off nipple
  • More frequent night feedings

In mom, it could be

  • Very painful nursing
  • Cracked/sore nipples
  • Mastitis or plugged ducts
  • Loss of milk supply

It varies from baby to baby and woman to woman, so if you think something isn’t right, find out from other moms in your area who the best lactation consultant is, who knows how to spot tongue and lip tie. Tongue tie is discussed much more often than lip tie, and we need to change that!

Within 24 hours I went to see a lactation consultant at a free breastfeeding clinic and she confirmed that my son had lip tie. What a weight is lifted off your shoulders when you finally know what is wrong with your baby, despite doctors and nurses saying “he’s fine.” I booked an appointment with Dr James Jesse in Loma Linda, California. He is the very best of the best, a dentist who uses a laser, not a knife, to cauterize the labial frenulum away from the lip. People travel far and wide to get to Dr Jesse, and because the procedure is so fast, I managed to get an appointment the next day.

The doctor and his staff are absolutely wonderful, and he checked all of us and confirmed we all have lip tie except my husband. Dr Jesse said my son’s in particular was severe and when I asked about not losing my milk supply he confirmed that I was lucky I still had it. So we chose to have both children undergo a laser frenectomy. My 2.5 year old daughter went first, and here is what she looked like before:

photo 1

And here she was during the procedure. They turned the television on for her, gave her a shot to numb the area (I was TERRIFIED she would freak out, but not a word. Not even a flinch. The needle is the smallest apparently) then he lasered it within a few minutes, she hopped off, they gave her a sugar free popsicle and she was as happy as can be.

photo-2-300x300

My son’s was more difficult for me to watch. My husband had to lie in the dentist’s chair and hold his arms down while a very sweet nurse held his head. It is a very quick procedure, only a few minutes, but when your baby is crying (and note- he started crying before the doctor even touched him because he didn’t like being restrained) it feels like an eternity. As soon as it was over he immediately wanted to nurse. I didn’t notice a difference which didn’t surprise me as we caught it so late. The earlier lip tie and tongue tie are treated, the better your nursing relationship will be.

Both kids were absolutely fine throughout the day and sleeping at night, you wouldn’t have even known they’d had this done! Dr Jesse said I could give Children’s Tylenol, but I didn’t see a need. After care is very easy- you simply need to give the top lip three quick lifts every hour while they’re awake for a week to make sure it doesn’t grow back. We instantly noticed a difference in both kids’ smile. Here is what my daughter looked like about 9 hours after the procedure.

photo 3

Notice in the bottom photo you can slightly see the wound, which means when she smiles, instead of her top lip being pulled by her frenulum, she can now smile freely.

Several people have asked why I chose to have my toddler’s done, as she is no longer nursing. We chose to because lip ties can cause:

  • A gap in-between the two top teeth requiring braces
  • Cavities in the four top front teeth as food is unable to escape freely
  • Speech issues
  • Dental issues

Within 24 hours of me posting about this on my Facebook page, 5 children were spotted to have lip ties. This is something that commonly goes unnoticed, along with tongue tie. Both require someone who specializes in this area to diagnose them, not any pediatrician or lactation consultant can spot it. So please spread the word. You could be helping another mother like me who had no idea what was wrong, but knew something was not right.

Have you or your children got lip tie? Or tongue tie? Let us know in the comments below.

 

Read more about lip tie HERE

 

Ladan About Ladan

Ladan Rashidi, Senior Editing Manager.
Ladan is a British mother of two, who moved to California in 2008 to live with her husband. Born and raised in London, she has the very British sarcastic sense of humor and is always laughing at herself. And her husband. None of her previous workplaces prepared her for becoming a mother and having the two most demanding bosses in the world, but also the cutest.

Comments

  1. Lorena says:

    Omg, thanks for posting this. I new since my daughter was born that something wasn’t right. She had the gap in her gums and now , she is 6 minths, it is all together. Just last week I took her for her follow up and asked her pediatrician about it, she said exactly what you were told. I will look for help. Thanks again for posting, and I’m glad everything went well with your kids.

  2. Halima says:

    Thanks a lot for posting this up! We parents need to either become our own doctors nowadays and research a lot or be lucky with postings like yours.
    You seriously were blessed by finding the baby wearing group post but what about all us other parents who were told our milk supply isn’t enough just bec they couldn’t figure out the real problem of the issue???

    Again thanks a lot for clearing this and opening our eyes…

  3. Ladan Ladan says:

    Thank you ladies for your kind words and support! Lorena, I hope you find the help of a great lactation consultant :)

  4. Jenny says:

    How funny reading this article today. I just had my 2 week old son’s upper lip tie released by Dr. Jesse yesterday! He and his staff are wonderful! I am still having a lot of pain with nursing though, so unfortunately, it hasn’t seemed to help us much. He can open his mouth wider though. I think my baby needs some training on how to suck properly, he doesn’t move his tongue correctly and is causing me pain and not transferring much milk. Any advice on where to go from here? I am pumping right now to save my sore, sore nipples! Anyway, Dr. Jesse is great – I hope more Dr.’s and dentists will become aware of lip (and tongue) ties in the near future.

  5. Sheena says:

    This is what happened to me I didn’t realize my daughter had the lip tie until she was 3 months and the pain was gone. I’ve been struggling with my milk supply but didn’t realize it was due to her tie bc I still feel the letdown. But I discovered it bc of a Facebook group.

  6. My seven month old has lip tie and we’re deciding whether or not to revise.

    dana
    LilFamily.com

  7. Jacki says:

    My 11 week old baby had her lip tie released last week in Brisbane. I knew on day 3 that my feeding relationship was different this time when I compared to my 2 sons – she didn’t flange her lip, it was excruciating to feed her and I felt her tongue was short as she never poked it out beyond her gums. It took 3 doctors and 3 lactation consultants before this was finally confirmed as a type 3 upper lip tie. I’d had thrush, mastitis, blocked ducts and toe curling nipple and breast pain but everyone was assuring me it was me and my latching techniques…but I just knew it wasn’t that as I’d successfully fed my sons to 18months each. I knew how to latch my baby – something wasn’t rightin her mouth. He poos were onfrequent and strange looking, she vomited all he time and in the early weeks was writhing about it pain whenever she lay down flat. After assessment from a fantastic LC it turns out bub has the lip tie, an asymmetric jaw, a small jaw, bubble pallet and tension in her tongue (we aren’t sure wether to releas the tongue as there is a lot of tissue in the way and it would mean putting her under a general – most docs aren’t keen to do this till baby is at least 6 months old). I’ve been emotionally and physically shattered by this experience and it has affected my relationship with my baby and my husband. I am determined to push on with hope that things improve and she re-learns how to suck properly etc. we are having cranial work by an osteopath and I am also hopefully this will help. Has anyone else gone on to have a pain free and enjoyable feeding experience after a similar start?

  8. Stephanie says:

    I never had any problems nursing my daughter (now 3.5 years old). Her teeth are happy although she has a gap which runs in my husband’s family. Just today my friend told me that she noticed a lip tie in her son who is a year old. She has had trouble nursing, etc. Out of curiosity, I looked it up and found that my daughter has what appears to be a stage 4 lip tie! Is it possible/common to have a lip tie but have no other issues. Her teeth are very healthy now – it is possible to be diligent in cleaning and diet to prevent tooth decay?

  9. Jen Fuelling says:

    My 2.5 yr old has a severe speech delay, a gap in his front teeth, and decay that has chipper his front tooth. I started researching and found info on lip ties and he has a stage 4 lip tie. I have him I speech therapy now and they agree and I noticed my 9 month old also has a stage 4 lip tie. We were referred to an ENT who is doing the lip tie surgery on them both tomorrow.

  10. Victoria Buller says:

    In April 2012 I gave birth to my first child, a baby girl, Aria. For three long nights Aria wouldn’t nurse, the lactation department said I was doing everything properly and that she would eat if she was hungry. On day four I was sick of waiting and trying so I gave her a bottle of formula which she took immediately. We never found out why, we just assumed she didn’t like something about the whole situation and let her eat freely from what she wanted. At nearly 16 months I got a call from my sister in law, who was watching her. She told me that Aria had fallen and bit her tongue and when she went to look at it she seen something that moms in an attachment parenting group she is a part of posted. She told me that Aria had something called a lip tie, like a tongue tie on your lip and explained it and how it is probably what effected our breastfeeding. I had never heard of it, so while researching I found you page (first one!) it explains it so well and leaves nearly no question unanswered. Thanks so much for taking time to post about this!

  11. Angela says:

    omg, my 15 month old daughter is lip tied, looks like the most dramatic one, I can’t believe it, I tried so hard to breastfeed, thank you, thank you, thank you, now what do I do? any advice?

  12. Ashley says:

    Thank you for posting this! I have just realized, mostly because of this article, that my 16 wk old has lip-tie! Oddly enough, our pediatrician checked for the tongue-tie but didn’t do so for the lip..(?) She has every single symptom/struggle in the list above. Thankfully I have only had slight discomfort from nursing, but I’m more concerned with her! She still only sleeps for 2 hours at a time and will feed as soon as she wakes from her 2 hour sleep periods. I feel so badly that she’s not getting more sleep! Her reflux is resolving itself a bit, but who knows if she also suffers from a little of the “silent” reflux type…

    We are looking into getting this fixed ASAP. Unfortunately no one in our area does the laser surgery; from what I’ve read there are only 12 or so docs that use the laser in the US! We will fly if necessary. I am not putting my child under anesthesia at so young of an age.

    There’s a support group on FB under “tongue tie” that I’m joining so I can find out more. I’ve also been googling like crazy!!! Hopefully this will help her nurse better, get better/longer sleep. I wish I would’ve had this figured out a LOT sooner. I even went to 2 LC appt.’s and it wasn’t diagnosed. She used to nurse for 45 minutes because she would fall asleep (probably from being exhausted from the effort. She wasn’t jaundiced).

    It makes me sad to think of how many mothers have to stop nursing because their babies have this problem and it isn’t diagnosed????? :(

  13. I just learned about lip ties and tongue ties last night. I cried. No, I wept. My son is 2 years now, and we are expecting #2, and I have been looking forward to attempting breastfeeding again with great anxiety. Breastfeeding was excruciatingly painful for me from day one through 7 1/2 months, when I finally gave up with a very, very heavy heart. I had no supply. My son had horrible reflux. And after 2 months of supplementing with formula (due to FTT at 5 1/2 months), it was clear he no longer wanted to nurse, as he would latch for about 2 seconds then look expectedly for his bottle. I used Breastflow bottles, and remember distinctly how strange I thought it was that his upper lip depressed the nipple so severely. Then last night I learned about lip ties, it’s effect on breastfeeding, and that it’s hereditary. I had one removed as a child, only I’ve never known that it was a lip tie. I checked my son, and sure enough, his upper lip is tied. So I wept. I wept for relief that maybe my failure to breastfeed wasn’t really my failure at all, but due to this circumstance outside anyone’s control. I wept with anger and frustration that neither the LC I consulted on several occasions, nor my currently breastfeeding doctor ever thought to do the simplest thing, look inside my son’s mouth to check for ties. And I wept because I now have hope and renewed confidence for breastfeeding our new baby. You better believe I’ll be discussing lip tie with my midwife at my next appointment, and I will be checking the inside of this baby’s mouth before I attempt latching the first time.

  14. Julie says:

    I’m in tears… I had an awful time BFing my daughter and finally gave up after a few months because she didn’t latch very well, it was painful, and my supply was so low. Someone posted about it the other day and I took a second look at the cute little gap in my daughter’s teeth (she’ll be 2 in a month) and sure enough, she has lip tie. It goes all the way through her two front teeth so I guess a Class 3 or 4. I wish someone had told me! Or looked! I still feel terrible for ‘failing’ at breast feeding. I’ll definitely be spreading the word. Unfortunately, my daughter also had ITP when she was a baby and from all the blood draws they did, she freaks out when being held down, so I don’t think we can fix it until she’s older and understands what’s going on. Thank you so much for posting this. I just wish I had found it 2 years ago!

  15. A different perspective….I just found out that both my girls have stage 4 lip tie but I saw my dentist yesterday and he said not to worry. He said if I get it corrected now it will create scar tissue between the 2 front teeth and they will have trouble coming together even with braces (or will have trouble staying together after braces). He said to wait until my girls get braces and get it done at that time. That way the scar tissue will form around the teeth after they are already in place and will essentially end up holding them together rather than pushing them apart. I know it’s just one person’s opinion but I do trust his opinion. My siblings and I went to school with his kids and have been seeing him since we were little. His wife and son both had lip tie and his son just became a dentist this year and has perfect teeth so he is speaking from experience. As far as decay, he said you either have weak teeth or strong teeth genetically. Just make sure to take care of your teeth, stay away from sugary drinks and snacks, and see your dentist regularly. And yes, it does make a difference with latching while breastfeeding in some cases, but it’s up to the individual to determine if it’s worth it or not.

  16. Stephanie says:

    Wow! My 3.5yo has one like your toddler did – and she had cavities behind her top front teeth. My 18mo has the worst kind and a big gap between her front teeth. Thanks for posting! I’ll follow up on this now.

  17. Lisa S. says:

    I just discovered my 2.9 y/o has a significant upper lip tie. And sure enough, I do as well! I had a big space between my teeth as a kid. It also made it hard to fit mouth guards for sports, and I occasionally nick it and irritate it when I’m brushing my teeth.

    My daughter is still nursing, but we don’t have latch issues, really, though she does occasionally latch a bit too shallow and cause a little pain. I’m probably going have hers corrected so she doesn’t have to deal with similar issues as she gets older. My biggest concern is orthodontic, but if she’s into certain sports the mouth guard thing is an issue, too.

  18. GMoncrieff says:

    I live in the UK. My husband had not tongue and lip tie. My first daughter had tongue tie, which after 6 months of many struggles, including a breast abscess, we got the tongue tie removed. My second daughter has quite a severe upper lip tie, which also caused many problems feeding. I was convinced these problems were due to the tie but pretty much no one believed me. I forced myself on many a professional but anyway they won’t so anything about it here. My third daughter, now 6 weeks has a pretty severe tie. She can hardly latch on at all and is taking so much air in that it’s painful to watch. She feeds every hour and a half. I have pretty much given up hope of getting any help bit if anybody knows of any, please please please let me know.

  19. Jennifer says:

    I just noticed my 14 month old has this. Can he be put to sleep when getting it corrected?

  20. chris says:

    thank you so much for sharing this. Both my little ones have tongue ties, which I knew about, but I have just discovered they have lip ties too. Thankfully despite done issues I have bfed them both, my daughter to 13 months and my soon currently at 10 months. I’m so moved that I have a tear on my eye after reading your words. So much makes sense now. I’m off to do some research into laser reversal in the uk. Thanks again, Chris & family

  21. Angela says:

    My daughter just turned a year old and is getting her 2nd top tooth and I just now noticed it. When she was born she had a gap in her gum and I asked about it but they said it was unique and it started closing up so I didn’t think anything of it. She eats fine smiles fine and is forming words. If she gets more teeth and and they close together the connector will be in between her teeth.

  22. Stephanie says:

    Thank you so much. I’m in tears… my son is 5 months old and we are still breastfeeding it was so hard in the beginning to have him latch he was in the NICU for 3 weeks. I wasn’t able to see.a.good lactation consultant until he was discharged. By that time I was happily nursing with a shield (happily to the eye I wanted to do it like a “normal” mom so badly) finally I stopped using the shield and my left boob dried up because of baby boy denying it and favoring the right. I still nurse with one breast…. I noticed his gums looked odd just a few weeks ago called the doc and they said just wait until his 6 month check up! But this is it… this is exactly it..

  23. Adrienne says:

    Thank you SO MUCH for this post. I didn’t realize that this was the reason my two-year-old daughter was leaving a bite imprint on me for so long. I’m going to take her in and make sure it gets taken care of!

  24. My daughter is 2 years old and also have problems as above. I did see a doctor and get specific instructions. This article offers a lot more for my new knowledge. Thank you.

  25. Colleen says:

    My 7 month old son was just diagnosed with this by a lactation consultant. This explains months of hell. He would not nurse, had extremely low weight gain, colic, gas, reflux…..everything you described. All the pediatrician said was “supplement”. I went to a new pediatrician at 2 months. She put my son in the hospital and called a social worker on me to investigate. We were discharged and I was ordered not to breast feed. I continued to pump and bottle feed. At 4 months I told the pediatrician about his horrible reflux. Was told it was normal. At 6 months he still refused to nurse but I religiously pumped every three hours and offered the breast once a day. Finally at 7 months I reached out to a lactation consultant. The pediatrician refused to sign orders so I had to pay out of pocket but it was worth it. He was seen by an ENT and his frenotomy is scheduled to correct his severe lip tie and tongue tie. Don’t understand why pediatricians are not more knowledgable. They should have recognized the signs and not acted like I was trying to starve my baby.

  26. This one is connected to the back side of her gum, she has no space to lift top lip with ease, speech issues, and it seems to be painful to eat! My daughter will be 16 months old on the 13th. I noticed about 2 months ago that she is not talking the way she should be on the few words she does say. I checked inside her mouth and saw her top 2 teeth are 1/3 to 1/2 inch apart separated by thick flesh. It is connected directly to the back side of her gums and leaves no room between her lip and gum. Has anyone had this happen? Is there something other than oral/maxillary surgery to help correct this for proper speech/dental development? Thanks in advace
    *kimmy* I tried to post pictures. It won’t allow attachments. ..

  27. We also saw Dr. Jesse for our newborn’s revisions. We discovered our 14 year old also had one despite not having breastfeeding issues as an infant — and his was pulling his bottom two teeth inward. Dr. Jesse suggested revision for him and we followed through. I documented both of their visits on my blog:
    http://www.staciebingham.com/2/post/2014/01/tongue-tie-picture.html
    http://www.staciebingham.com/2/post/2013/12/tongue-tie-in-an-older-kid.html

  28. My daughter has the cutest smile ever but I’ve beginning to wonder why her top teeth do not show when she smiles. (She is 1 1/2 yrs old) I recently got her to try to show all her teeth and I noticed the part that attaches seems to go down too far so I started researching it and found your story. A little background: I breastfed for two weeks and she latched just fine, it was not painful at all, but I gave her a bottle too soon so she wouldn’t breast feed anymore.. I exclusively pumped until she turned one so I would have never noticed! Any ways, I will be giving our dentist a call too see if they correct this kind of issue. Thank you!

  29. Lillian says:

    My 13 month old fell and ripped his Class IV lip tie last night. I had been nursing him with no issues. He has a huge gap between his top teeth, but I don’t mind because it is an adorable family trait. Now there is nothing between his teeth but air, and the bit that was attached is dangling. I talked to the pediatrician, who said to apply ice to help with the swelling, but didn’t seem worried at all.

    Can I expect breastfeeding to be different now? Is he going to need to learn to latch differently? I am guessing that even though it extended very far down it must have been pretty flexible if he was able to nurse normally

  30. Melissa says:

    My daughter is a week old and in my opinion isn’t quite nursing as she should be at this point. She isn’t tongue tied (my son was and we had it released) but after reading, I’m pretty sure she is lip tied. I then checked my 20 month old son and I’m pretty sure he is as well. Then the thought occurred to me that my husband had braces as a child (I did not). I came down and asked him why he had braces and sure enough – he says it was because of the gap between his teeth!! I’m not sure what my next move is, but I told my husband I would like them both to see the ENT at some point this year, clearly sooner than later if my daughters nursing habits do not improve. Thank you so much for all the info!!

  31. After 3 months doctors telling me that my son has colic and their was nothing wrong, some babies just are colicky. Even though I am a first time mom; I knew it wasn’t normal for a baby to have so much gas and pain. I had already seen a lactation counselor when he was 4 weeks because I felt overwhelmed with him feeding pretty much 24/7 and I felt my supply couldn’t keep up with his demand. She said everything was fine. After slow weight gain and concern to my pediatrician, my son was referred to a GI specialist. Oh it’s colic was the first answer, back within a week and it was “Oh, protein allergy put him on formula”. My mom instinct wanted to make sure before taking LO off the breast. I finally called the Breastfeeding Center about an hour away from me and made an appointment. We saw the Lactation Consultant today and she said my son has a Upper Lip Tie and a Partial Tongue Tie. She believes his gas colic is due to the large amount of air he is sucking in. Making an appointment ASAP to have them released and hoping all his issues resolve. I wanted to post this in hopes of saving others from possible colic issues. I am very thankful we have found this early enough and that I didn’t give up on breastfeeding. I hope my experience my help others. Thank you for the post about your experiences.

  32. Andrea says:

    My Daughter is lip tied. She is 3 now. And it doesn’t affect her speech but it does make brushing her teeth a little tricky. The dentist told me they don’t do anything till she is 5 because they have hopes the teeth will close the gap and fix the problem.. But I guess I’ll wait and see. I’m so glad to see this is common and if she needs to have it cut it’s not a painful process. Thanks for your article :)

  33. cynthiam says:

    You used to live in the UK. My husband and I are American and living in Bath until Summer 2014. Our little guy is 7 months. I noticed he has a lip tie. Does the GP do this sort of thing here, do you think they would recommend me to someone else. Who would I ask for?

    I will call tomorrow, just curious your experience with the British system.

  34. Corie says:

    I had recently read something on FB from a page that I like about lip and tongue tie. some of the symptoms were the same problems my daughter and I were having. I looked, and it was hard since she was fighting me, but sure enough she has lip tie. I finally got to check today and she has tongue tie too. Going to get this taken care of as soon as possible. she is 15 months and still nursing and would love for our breastfeeding relationship to improve, as well as her gaining more weight- she is only 16 lbs 7 oz. I just can’t believe that is isn’t something that is required to be checked over at birth.

  35. Trudy Anderson says:

    My son is two years old and i just found out he has to have both lip tie surgery and tongue tie surgery, his dentist was the one who brought it to my attention, He saw the dentist when he was 1 year old and they said nothing to me

  36. Kate M says:

    I saw several postings on a “mom to be” group on Facebook that I’m part of, and a woman kept mentioning tongue and lip ties. I googled and came to your page. Thank you for the info! I wasn’t as lucky as you however. At 18 I got braces to correct a gap in my front teeth. After only a couple of months they had me go in for surgery from what is sounding to me like a lip tie that was never corrected. My surgery was done with local anesthetic but required knives and drills. They had to drill to my gums to remove where it connected in to my palate. I was bruised and sore for several days after. Now that I know that this is genetic, I will be sure to check my baby when she is born. Id definitely recommend people have it corrected earlier for their children if the procedure is as simple as it was for you guys since at 18 years old it was quite painful. Thank you again for your info!!

  37. Thank you for all your comments! I have been brought to tears by them, because I know what it is like to be failed by the people you trust- healthcare professionals. I hope more doctors, nurses and lactation consultants learn the importance of looking for lip tie and trusting a mother’s instincts!

  38. Maggie vogt says:

    Thank you so much for this info. I didn’t know that what my daughter had might have been the issue with my breastfeeding. I was only able to make it 3 months with her due to poor milk supply. I now have a 3 week old son and have had the most painful experience feeding him. I’m going to check his lip when he wakes up… but I think he may have the same condition as his sister.

  39. Brettaneynquinton@gmail.com says:

    My son has both ties. Minor tongue tie and major lip tie. Our pediatrician told us about the lip tie around 2 months old, but I found out about lip ties on facebook and checked his lip when he was 11 months old. I was never able to nurse him because of other issues, but I still want it taken care of for dental & speech reasons. Because of other things going on in his mouth his doctpr didn’t want to remove the ties yet. We see a specialist dentist & orthodontist in a few weeks so I will find out more then! Thanks for posting! I am amazed at how common this is & how many people know nothing about it (myself included until recently!)

  40. Denise Ulery says:

    My first son was born with a tongue tie. They did notice it at the hospital and referred us to an ENT close to the hospital, however, Erasmus moved an hour away and wanted one closer to home. The lactation consultant told me to as for a referral from the pediatrician when at our newborn appointment. We followed this advice, and the pediatrician told us not to rush, that it was common and most children grow out of it. She actually refused to give us a referral. After 3 weeks of painful breastfeeding, we made an appointment with the ENT that was an hour away. He was wonderful. He explained that my son had a pretty severe tongue tie and while some children can outgrow it, my son would not have. The procedure was very quick and seemed mostly painless. My son could breastfeed a lot better once it was done, but my milk supply suffered and we could only breastfeed for 3 months total with formula supplementation.
    Looking back on it, I was an emotional first time mom and I should have listened to my gut and had my son seen right away, but as a parent you trust that your pediatrician has your child’s best interest at heart and knows what the hell they are talking about.
    Thankfully my son is a thriving 3 yr old with no other issues.

  41. Julie says:

    Now I don’t know what to think!! I was told the upper lip frenulum was no big deal!! Now granted who knows if my kids have it super bad. Maybe not as thick? All I know is both kids have gaps in the two front upper teeth and the frenulum on one of them for sure goes all the way to the teeth.

    I had some pain for two weeks with this one, with nursing, but then it was gone, and there were no milk supply issues.

    Both kids talk fine, eat fine…the kid I referenced to had to suck harder it seemed but that got better. She still nurses at 18 months and everything she does like a pro!!

    So until this article we were just gonna get it cut when the kids are older, before their permanent teeth.

    I guess it depends on the case.

    The doctors say it’s very common, and it’s genetic and can be from a grandma or grandpa, not just the mom or dad.

    If I’m missing something, say anyone thinks I should take care of it all sooner, please let me know : )

  42. OMG… thank you for posting this! I was in a similar predicament with my son, saying something was not right. I thought I just had a low milk supply… As he was checked for the usual palate deformities, latching, and tongue tie! I just checked him after his nap and sure enough he has it. He also has been a little late to speak and while babbles doesnt make sounds that use his lips as much (like mama). Maybe coincidence… Maybe not. I am currently pregnant with my second and have been stressing out over trying to breastfeed again.

  43. Virginia R says:

    I must have had that. My mom took me to the dentist at age 7 or 8 and they cut that same spot. I just remember not being happy about them doing it. Sounds like it was a good decision she made but I don’t know that she knew that it could cause all those problems. She was just trying to prevent a gap between my two front teeth. I did have speech problems when I was younger.

    I’m glad I read this article. Now I know if/when I have children to keep an eye out for this.

  44. Thank you so much for bringing awareness to this!! I was in the process of drying up my milk all the while feeling guilty and horrible for giving up breast feeding when my son was 6 weeks old. We have been dealing with tons of gas and colic one with only being able to nurse on one side because of the pain. I emailed pictures to a surgeon I found on another website along with seeing a lactation consultant and they both confirmed he has a lip tie! I can’t wait to get this fixed and resume our breast feeding!! Thank you so much!!!

  45. Travina says:

    I noticed my daughter had tongue tie right after she was born only because my nephew had it and got it corrected when he was about a year old. It was painful the first days in the hospital. I asked the lactation consultant during the class in the hospital just to confirm and she said i was right and to talk to the peds. I talked to the peds and they gave us the info for ENT. We had it corrected by her second week of life. I only noticed get lip tie recently. She had that small gap, I’m just surprised the ENT didn’t say anything.my daughter its two now and at her first dentist appointment I’ll ask if it should be corrected.

  46. Ladan Ladan says:

    Wow, I’m blown away by some of these comments! Please keep sharing your stories ladies, you never know which mom might read it and realize they’re in the same position!

  47. Kasha says:

    My nephew has lip tie. I was the first to notice it about a month ago after looking in his month to check for teething. He is a little over 7 months right now. She had problems with bf and quit almost right away. Her milk never came in fully. Anyway she had him at the dr Monday for a check up and the pediatrician said everything looked fine. I could not convince her otherwise this morning when she dropped him off. Any ideas?

  48. Rebecca J says:

    Had an appointment today for my 2 month old and found out she is in fact tongue tied, we’ll find out about possibly lip tied at the next appointment. Thank you!!

  49. Jenn B says:

    Thank you so much for posting this!!! My son is one year old now but he never latched correctly when breastfeeding the entire time!!! I had to use a nipple shield every single time. And over time that severely decreases your supply so I couldn’t breastfeed after 3 months because I dried up. I cried thinking I was a failure at getting him to nurse when now I know it was because the poor little guy couldn’t open all the way!! His lip tie is probably the Class II but definitely noticeable. I really appreciate this post!!!

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